ITC Grants

ITC Grants

Summary

Inclusiveness target countries (ITC) grants are a COST tool which help PhD students and early-career investigators from participating Inclusiveness Target Countries attend international science and technology related conferences that are not organised by a COST Action. The Action aims at supporting their participation at relevant conferences, related to the research area of EUROFAM.

The COST Action CA18123 has five working groups. Conferences for which the grant is provided can contribute to the specific related tasks of the working groups, particularly tasks related to WG 2, 3, and 4.

Potential applicants that are interested to submit an application should read the ITC Grants guidelines for more details about eligibility, criteria for evaluation, financial support, criteria for reimbursement and how to apply.

Information for ITC grants guidelines: PDF iconca18123_itcgrants_guidelines_updated2020.pdf

Further details can be consulted at the COST Vademecum:
https://www.cost.eu/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Vademecum_June2019.pdf

Application period I: 1-15th May, Evaluation 16-31st May (currently stopped due to Covid19 pandemic)

Application period II: 1-15th August, Evaluation 16-31st August

Application III: 1-15th November, Evaluation 16-30th November

Application period IV: 1-15th February, Evaluation 16-28th February


Contacts

ITC Grants Coordinator: Camellia Hancheva (hancheva@phls.uni-sofia.bg)

Application period I: 1-15th May, Evaluation 16-31st May 2019 (CLOSED)

This Call is CLOSED

Application period II: 1-15th August, Evaluation 16-31st August 2019 (CLOSED)

This Call is CLOSED

Application III: 1-15th November, Evaluation 16-30th November 2019 (CLOSED)

This Call is CLOSED

Application period IV: 1-15th February, Evaluation 16-28th February 2020 (CLOSED)

This Call is CLOSED

Application period I: 1-15th May, Evaluation 16-31st May 2020

Currently stopped due to Covid19 pandemic

Application period II: 1-15th August, Evaluation 16-31st August 2020

Launching soon.

Application III: 1-15th November, Evaluation 16-30th November 2020

Launching soon.

Application period IV: 1-15th February, Evaluation 16-28th February 2021

Launching soon.

Is being a parent in Portugal satisfying? How gender, parental burnout and parental competence relate to life satisfaction

Name and surname: Marisa Matias

Home institution: Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences – University of Porto

Field of research interest: Gender and Family relationships; Work-family integration; Parenting and couple dynamics


Name of the conference/congress: 1st international conference on parental burnout

Organizers: Isabelle Roskam & Moira Mikolajczak, UCLouvain, Belgium

Website: https://uclouvain.be/fr/instituts-recherche/ipsy/1st-international-conference-on...

A quote: The environment of the conference was very welcoming allowing for fruitful discussions that went beyond the time slot for the presentations.


The presentation: Is being a parent in Portugal satisfying? How gender, parental burnout and parental competence relate to life satisfaction Abundant research has stressed that parents, across industrialized societies, compared to nonparents, show lower levels of well-being. This is commonly attributed to the fact that children increase adults’ exposure to a variety of stressors (e.g. demands of time and energy, work-family conflict, sleep deprivation) and thus the emotional rewards of having children may be out-weighed by the emotional and financial costs associated with contemporary parenthood. These strains may be heightened in contexts where minimal institutional support is provided, as it is the case of Portugal, and among women, who have the greater responsibility for child care in virtually all OECD countries. On the positive side, perceptions of parental competence have been found to relate positively with psychological well-being. Therefore, in this study the focus is on characterizing parenthood in Portugal analyzing the linkages among parental burnout, parental competence and life satisfaction, as an indicator of wellbeing, disentangling these linkages for mother and for fathers. Data was collected using online and paper and pencil self-report questionnaires. A convenience sample of 407 Portuguese individuals (n= 205 women) was gathered. Most of the sample is working (97% of men; 89% of women) has, in average, 1.7 children and is a two-parent family (88-89%). T-Tests and correlation analyses were performed to explore the linkages among the proposed constructs. Our results show that women have higher levels of parental burnout than men, in all the considered dimensions (exhaustion, contrast, being fed up and emotional distancing) and that women perceive themselves as less competent in the parental role than men. No gender differences were found in regard to life satisfaction. Parental burnout is linked with lower levels of life satisfaction and parental competence for both men and women, with the exception that men’s life satisfaction does not seem to be linked to men’s parental exhaustion. Life satisfaction is positively linked with parental competence for both men and women Overall our results grant additional evidence to the parental burnout construct and measurement and highlight gender specificities that can be interpreted in light of societal views on what is expected of mothers and fathers. Indeed, Portuguese mothers (as well as mothers in other societies) are more overloaded with the task of parenting and this is noticeable in our findings of less perception on parental competence and more parental burnout.